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  • What makes our concerts different is that we provide a venue for up-and-coming musicians. Performers no one has heard of, but are working to establish themselves in the music world. We support aspiring artists when no one else will. Your swan donations and attendance are your way of also showing your support for the arts, so help us keep our free Concerts on the Dock series alive.

     

    Ah, yes. 2016. For many, it was a year of despair. From losing several iconic artists and musicians to that challenging election, it seemed as though the year would never end. But rather than fret over all the bad, terrible, gut-wrenching sadness that occurred, we strive to stay positive by focusing on all the good that came from the year. 2016 was a year of growth for us at Lowe Mill A&E. We expanded North Floor with the addition of five new studios and later took over the entire first floor of the North Wing, giving the public access to the entire building.

    Several new tenants now reside in our First Floor North including Deb D’Zio, a wonderfully weird quilter who also crochets and teaches classes, as well as Aveum, a commercial space and aeronautics startup. Wander through our First Floor Connector and explore the First Floor of the North Wing. We’re also in the process of brining in a few more tenants who cannot be announced at this time. Stay tuned!

     

    We said “hello” several new artists to the facility, and farewell to a few.

    Our galleries expanded thanks to the revitalization of bringing new, amazing regional and national shows to our public art spaces.

    And we welcomed several new members to our Mill family including our event coordinator’s Lucy Littlesong, Radiant Shade’s Phaedra Jane, and many more. Our former gallery coordinator left us for bigger and better endeavors (we will never forget you, Aaron!), but his leave brought on a vibrant new member. (Welcome, Amy Mayfield!)

    We…

    The National Poster Retrospecticus came to us for a last-minute collaboration for a pop-up show in our Railroad Room 2 at the Mill in September.

     

    But perhaps the most exciting part of the year was the announcement of the new sky bridge connecting our neighborhood to Downtown Huntsville, ultimately branching the entire arts and entertainment district. Additionally, this new bridge provides a safer route for cyclists and pedestrians venturing between East and West of the Parkway.

    As if things couldn’t get better, the City of Huntsville later announced new retail development space filling the empty lot across from the Mill. Rather than removing aspects of the neighborhood, the City has decided to expand our thriving community. Helping our neighborhood prosper by adding to and not destroying what we hold–that’s just part of the big picture.

    Our neighborhood deserves a little attention, and we are looking forward to seeing these changes in the coming year.

    But a reflection wouldn’t be complete without a little future insight.

    So what does this new year look like for our arts facility?

    More growth. More events. More change.

    Jamey Grimes brought one of our most popular exhibitions to the Mill in January 2016. This cycle of shows was an introduction of all the new, exciting installations we are bringing to our six public art spaces in 2017.

     

    Here are a few things to get excited about in 2017:

    Plus tons more surprises along the way. That’s usually how things go at the Mill. We try to “plan”, but most ideas just arise in the moment.

    We closed out the year with a Stranger Things Christmas Party, a collaboration with Vertical House Records in their soon-to-be new space at the Mill.

     

    Thank you to everyone who supported us this past year. We are so grateful for all of our patrons, the swan donations, sponsorships, artists, makers, and the Hudson family. 

    Stay in touch by following us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Sign up for our newsletter. But most importantly, show your support by visiting and supporting our artists, makers, and independent businesses at the Mill. 

  • North Floor Feb10-2

    Today, our staff took a look at First Floor North to discuss renovations all while gathering a better understanding of the layout. The current tenants are still in the process of moving out, so there is a bit of cleanup left to do. Eventually we’ll have the chance to go in and start tearing things apart, laying out studio space, removing walls, and more. Yes. It will be a lot of work, but what most people don’t realize is the amount of time and dedication that has already gone into making Lowe Mill what it is today. Most of what we have wasn’t here when we took over the facility. Our executive director, with the help of our hardworking staff, designed floor plans for the interior and exterior of the building. Together, they had an idea and spent endless hours making that vision a reality. And that’s exactly what we plan to do with First Floor North. What we see when we look at this empty floor is an opportunity to grow and expand, the freedom to completely transform a once used area into a space that works for us, our tenants, and patrons. This is such an exciting time for us as we continue to grow here at Lowe Mill.

    At this point, we are still searching for more artists and makers to help take over the space. Aspiring tenants have the chance to help us redesign the space. If you’re interested in touring the space, contact our executive director Marcia Freeland for more information: marciafreeland@lowemill.net.

  • Our gallery coordinator Aaron Head and our exhibiting artists have spent the week installing new shows in all 7 of our galleries. It’s a tough job. Constant hanging, rearranging, rehanging, shuffling–day after day.

    Here’s a little behind-the-scenes action from the installation with artist Rebecca Young in our 3rd Floor West Gallery, and installation from the group exhibition featuring the works of Logan Tanner, Robert Bean, and Kristy Jane From-Brown in our North Floor Gallery, although both shows are not entirely done at this point. Nevertheless, Reception Night is this Friday, and every gallery will be complete. And it’s going to look amazing.

    Opening receptions for all shows is Friday, Nov. 13, from 6-8PM. Come interact with the artists and their works, enjoy some food and drinks, and BUY SOME ART during Lowe Mill’s Reception Night!

     

  • Our next Reception Night is coming up, and we couldn’t be more excited. Since our new gallery coordinator has taken over, opening receptions have grown into an event of their own. We get really excited about it, but no matter how much we promote, no matter how much we spread the word, some people are still confused as to what “Reception Night” actually is. Reception Night Poster Nov 13

    You probably have a general idea of an opening reception at a museum or gallery. Once an artist’s work goes on display, the venue will host an opening reception honoring that artist’s exhibition. People are then invited to meet the artist and hear about his or her work during opening reception, and then said exhibition is officially on display.

    But our receptions are a little different. Rather than hosting one reception at a time, we tear down all 7 of our galleries, fill them with new works, and then invite the public to spend the evening interacting with each artist and their works during our Reception Night. Food and drinks are served, and several of our studios are open, making our opening receptions a little more exciting. Attendees truly get their fill of the arts–meeting the artists, viewing new pieces, and experiencing a variety works, mediums, stories, colors, textures, sights, sounds, and cultures throughout each gallery all on one night.

    It’s the only way to experience an opening reception, really.

    This go-round, we have some unbelievable exhibitions including the works of Tim Kerr who was the flagship exhibiting artist for Third Man Records as well as the exploration of three Southern painters’, Logan Tanner, Robert Bean, and Kristy Jane From-Brown, and their shared but distinct cultural experience.

    Learn about our upcoming Reception Night and new exhibitions by visiting our art shows collection.

  • Lowe Mill First Floor

    Last December, we expanded our already huge facility with the addition of our north wing. It was such an exciting time for all of us as we worked so hard to make the expansion a success. Those spaces filled up fast. Now, almost a year later, the second floor of the north building is covered with artists and makers of all kinds. From a gourmet popsicle shop to a small-batch whiskey distillery to painters and engravers and a stunning gallery space, our north floor is home to all sorts of creations.

    And now we’re about to add a little something more to the mix. Okay, so maybe it’s not that little.

    In March 2016, the north building’s first floor becomes available, and we are in search of a maker to fill that space. 36,000 square feet of space, to be exact. Trust me. You didn’t read that wrong. Yes, that is a TON OF SPACE! We’re searching for the ideal candidate to take over the floor. A maker with the perfect idea that will add to our already vibrant community of more than 200 working artists and entrepreneurs.

    But not only are we home to hundreds of artists and makers. Lowe Mill ARTS & Entertainment is the largest privately owned arts facility in America, and we’re always looking for ways to expand. We’re always on the move for new ideas, events, entertainment, artists, makers, and creations–be they wild, weird, or simply comforting–to add to our thriving creative community. And now, we’re looking for a maker to come make their mark.

    North Building First Floor PlanContact Lowe Mill Executive Director Marcia Freeland to apply.

    Say you have 36,000 square feet of workable space. How would you use it? What would you create? Let us know. We have the space, you bring the plan.

  • AL.com Instagram

    Apparently we’re one of 9 artist Instagram accounts you should follow in Alabama. Guess we’re famous now. Thank you to everyone who nominated us. We love and appreciate the support! And thank you to AL.com for honoring our feed. Go check out the article for more awesome accounts to follow, but follow us first of course.

  • Molly Reid, you are so strong, and the message you delivered was beautiful, powerful, and important.

    During Friday’s Concert on the Dock performance with Opposite Box, Molly decided to tackle a very relevant issue with a live body acceptance performance. What she did took a lot of courage and strength, and we are so thankful that she brought this message to Lowe Mill.

    This Is My Home
    a poem by Molly Reid

    This Is My Home
    I am fat
    I am bold
    I am beautiful.

    Still I have tried to be what I am not.
    I have covered it up in shame and shrouds of disappointment.
    I have hoped
    It might wither and die
    To be an acceptable corps.

     

    I have starved it.
    I have torn muscles and ligaments in the effort to keep it moving for fear someone might see me be still.
    I have worn nothing but black for years.
    I have not allowed people to see me eating for fear of their judgment.
    I have endured the smug voices of doctors, baristas, boys behind me in line in gym, co-workers, someone at the next table and cabdrivers who have thought it their place,
    Their right to tell me what must do to fix my fat body.
    I mutilated my insides and held my breath.
    I prayed that I would become nothing more than a fat shadow on the wall.

    I am no shadow.

    I am a spirit so bold and so strong
    That the house I live in must be big,
    It must bulge even and ungulate with the power it must contain.

    This Body
    This is my Home
    where real food is consumed
    butter and dark hand kneaded bread
    Mangos and Collard greens
    clean beef and butter beans.

    This is my home
    Worn and growing older
    But with bright amber window eyes
    Where desire and joy exist in equal measure
    Where pleasure in touch and warm kisses are savored
    Where I wake up with gratitude for what is and shall come
    Where I bask in the soft comfort of lying against my lover’s body
    Where I dance to the music of life
    Where I stretch toward the sun then touch the ground.
    Where I savor the sting and strain of a challenge.
    Where I laugh so loud I jiggle
    Where I sip from a cup of sweet chocolaty grace in being me
    Here
    Now

    This is my home
    I rest easy in it.
    I fill it to its edges and will deny no part of it.
    I tend to its bruises and build up its strength.
    I love it.
    I honor it
    Until in death I depart it.

  • Opposite Box gave us a nice surprise during Concerts on the Dock last night.

    The experimental rock group from Chattanooga is known for their high-energy live performances that usually comes equipped with some sort of fiery surprise. For our concert, the group provided the crowd with dozens and dozens of lanterns. During the second set, once the sun had disappeared, the crowd lit their lanterns, and sent them off into the night sky. It was beautiful.

    Seems like we’re always full of surprises here at the mill…

  • 10338823_10152408003614153_2902510928008262963_n

    Huddle up, team. It’s time for an important, quick talk.

    Lowe Mill ARTS & Entertainment is about to GROW. In 2014 we are expanding our already large roster of studio and business spaces into a part of this old factory building that until now has been used for storage by another company. This expansion is significant, y’all. As in, we will increase the square footage of our huge operation by about 1/3.

    For Huntsville this means a lot more space for new artists and businesses. We already have many people applying for space here, but we will ALWAYS welcome more.

    Here is everything you need to know about applying for space at Lowe Mill:

    1) Anyone can apply. Contact out Executive Director for an application. Contact info is on our website.

    2) Applications are approved or denied through an anonymous jury process. No one at Lowe Mill can help you get in. Approval is based on merit.

    3) The rubric for judging applications focuses on quality of work, quality of the application presentation itself, and how the applicant would fit into the Lowe Mill community. Why do you want to be at Lowe Mill and not any other rentable space? How can you benefit our creative community and how can our community benefit you?

    4) Applications that are hastily put together do not fly. If you do decide to apply, treat it as seriously as you would a job interview. There is no deadline for getting your application in, so take time to make the best impression possible.

    5) We love independent businesses and organizations. However, we only jury in businesses that have a creative focus. If you make something unique, or provide a creative service, by all means apply! If your businesses is a reseller of franchised or licensed products your time will probably be better spent looking for a different location. We want hand-made!

    That’s everything you need to know. Now share this info with that creative person or group in your life who needs to take the next step!

  • Plenty of people dream about working every day in a chocolate shop, but how many of us actually open one of our own? That’s exactly what sisters Michelle Novosel and Caitlyn Lyon did, and fortunately for the sweet-tooths of Huntsville these savvy siblings set up shop at Lowe Mill ARTS & Entertainment. Pizzelle’s Confections is a candy store four years in the making. When Michelle went to culinary school for pastry-making she soon realized that her true passion was chocolate. In the following years the pair worked with the delicious substance, tirelessly perfecting their recipes as well as design. The hard work paid off tremendously; Pizzelle’s truffles and sweets are equally pleasing to the eye as they are to the tongue. Read more

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